Treatment Results – BRCA Mutation | Rubraca® (rucaparib) tablets

In germline or somatic BRCA-mutated advanced ovarian cancer after 2 or
more chemotherapies

Rubraca was investigated in 2 clinical trials in the treatment setting1

Rubraca is indicated for the treatment of adult patients with deleterious BRCA mutation (germline and/or somatic)-associated epithelial ovarian, fallopian tube, or primary peritoneal cancer who have been treated with two or more chemotherapies. Select patients for therapy based on an FDA-approved companion diagnostic for Rubraca.1

Integrated efficacy analysis of these 2 studies2*

The efficacy of Rubraca was investigated in 106 patients in two multicenter, single-arm, open-label clinical trials, Study 10 and ARIEL2, in patients with advanced BRCA-mutant ovarian cancer who had progressed after 2 or more prior chemotherapies.1

All 106 patients received Rubraca 600 mg orally twice daily as monotherapy until disease progression or unacceptable toxicity. ORR and DOR were assessed by the investigator and IRR according to RECIST v1.1.1

Rubraca demonstrated durable responses in patients with germline and somatic BRCA-mutated advanced ovarian cancer2

Median DOR of 9.2 months (95% CI, 6.6-11.6)1

  • ORR assessment by IRR was 42% (95% CI, 32-52), with a median DOR of 6.7 months (95% CI, 5.5-11.1)1
  • 85% of patients had a decrease from baseline in the sum of the diameter of target lesions2
    • Most decreases were ≥30%
  • ORR was similar among1†:
    • patients with a BRCA1 or BRCA2 mutation
    • patients with a germline or somatic mutation

 

*The efficacy of Rubraca was investigated in 106 patients in 2 multicenter, single-arm, open-label clinical trials, Study 10 and ARIEL2, in patients with advanced BRCA-mutant ovarian cancer who had progressed after 2 or more prior chemotherapies. All 106 patients received Rubraca 600 mg orally twice daily as monotherapy until disease progression or unacceptable toxicity. ORR and DOR were assessed by the investigator and independent radiology review (IRR) according to Response Evaluation Criteria in Solid Tumors (RECIST) version 1.1.1

Based on prespecified, exploratory subgroup analyses.

DOR=duration of response; ORR=objective response rate.

Adverse reactions and laboratory abnormalities

Adverse Reactions
Laboratory Abnormalities

The primary safety analysis was based on a pooled patient population of 377 patients with ovarian cancer.1

§National Cancer Institute (NCI) Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events (CTCAE) v4.03.1

||At least one worsening shift in CTCAE grade and by maximum shift from baseline.1

CTCAE v4.03 defines any increase from baseline creatinine levels as a graded event; therefore, increases still within normal limits were recorded as laboratory abnormalities.1

 

Increase in ALT/AST led to treatment discontinuation in 0.3% of patients (1/377)1

Baseline and on-treatment values for ALT and AST in the ovarian cancer safety population (N=377)2

Increases in ALT and AST peaked at Day 15 of Cycle 1 and generally stabilized over time with continued treatment2

  • The following adverse reactions have been identified in <20% of the 377 patients treated with Rubraca 600 mg twice daily: dizziness (17%), neutropenia (15%), rash (includes rash, rash erythematous, rash maculopapular, and dermatitis) (13%), pyrexia (11%), photosensitivity reaction (10%), pruritus (includes pruritus and pruritus generalized) (9%), palmar-plantar erythrodysaesthesia syndrome (2%), and febrile neutropenia (1%)1
  • The majority of adverse reactions associated with Rubraca were grades 1 and 2. The most common grade 3 or 4 reaction was anemia1

ALT=alanine aminotransferase; AST=aspartate aminotransferase.

INDICATIONS

Rubraca is indicated:

  • for the maintenance treatment of adult patients with recurrent epithelial ovarian, fallopian tube, or primary peritoneal cancer who are in a complete or partial response to platinum-based chemotherapy

  • for the treatment of adult patients with deleterious BRCA mutation (germline and/or somatic)-associated epithelial ovarian, fallopian tube, or primary peritoneal cancer who have been treated with two or more chemotherapies. Select patients for therapy based on an FDA-approved companion diagnostic for Rubraca

SELECT IMPORTANT SAFETY INFORMATION

Read full ISI

Myelodysplastic Syndrome (MDS)/Acute Myeloid Leukemia (AML) occur uncommonly in patients treated with Rubraca® (rucaparib) tablets, and are potentially fatal adverse reactions. In approximately 1100 treated patients, MDS/AML occurred in 12 patients (1.1%), including those in long term follow-up. Of these, 5 occurred during treatment or during the 28 day safety follow-up (0.5%). The duration of Rubraca treatment prior to the diagnosis of MDS/AML ranged from 1 month to approximately 28 months. The cases were typical of secondary MDS/cancer therapy-related AML; in all cases, patients had received previous platinum-containing regimens and/or other DNA damaging agents.

Do not start Rubraca until patients have recovered from hematological toxicity caused by previous chemotherapy (≤ Grade 1).

Monitor complete blood counts for cytopenia at baseline and monthly thereafter for clinically significant changes during treatment.  For prolonged hematological toxicities (> 4 weeks), interrupt Rubraca or reduce dose (see Dosage and Administration (2.2) in full Prescribing Information) and monitor blood counts weekly until recovery. If the levels have not recovered to Grade 1 or less after 4 weeks or if MDS/AML is suspected, refer the patient to a hematologist for further investigations, including bone marrow analysis and blood sample for cytogenetics. If MDS/AML is confirmed, discontinue Rubraca.

Based on its mechanism of action and findings from animal studies, Rubraca can cause fetal harm when administered to a pregnant woman. Apprise pregnant women of the potential risk to a fetus.  Advise females of reproductive potential to use effective contraception during treatment and for 6 months following the last dose of Rubraca.

Most common adverse reactions in ARIEL3 (≥ 20%; Grade 1-4) were nausea (76%), fatigue/asthenia (73%), abdominal pain/distention (46%), rash (43%), dysgeusia (40%), anemia (39%), AST/ALT elevation (38%), constipation (37%), vomiting (37%), diarrhea (32%), thrombocytopenia (29%), nasopharyngitis/upper respiratory tract infection (29%), stomatitis (28%), decreased appetite (23%), and neutropenia (20%).

Most common laboratory abnormalities in ARIEL3 (≥ 25%; Grade 1-4) were increase in creatinine (98%), decrease in hemoglobin (88%), increase in cholesterol (84%), increase in alanine aminotransferase (ALT) (73%), increase in aspartate aminotransferase (AST) (61%), decrease in platelets (44%), decrease in leukocytes (44%), decrease in neutrophils (38%), increase in alkaline phosphatase (37%), and decrease in lymphocytes (29%).

Most common adverse reactions in Study 10 and ARIEL2 (≥ 20%; Grade 1-4) were nausea (77%), asthenia/fatigue (77%), vomiting (46%), anemia (44%), constipation (40%), dysgeusia (39%), decreased appetite (39%), diarrhea (34%), abdominal pain (32%), dyspnea (21%), and thrombocytopenia (21%).

Most common laboratory abnormalities in Study 10 and ARIEL2 (≥ 35%; Grade 1-4) were increase in creatinine (92%), increase in alanine aminotransferase (ALT) (74%), increase in aspartate aminotransferase (AST) (73%), decrease in hemoglobin (67%), decrease in lymphocytes (45%), increase in cholesterol (40%), decrease in platelets (39%), and decrease in absolute neutrophil count (35%).

Co-administration of rucaparib can increase the systemic exposure of CYP1A2, CYP3A, CYP2C9, or CYP2C19 substrates, which may increase the risk of toxicities of these drugs.  Adjust dosage of CYP1A2, CYP3A, CYP2C9, or CYP2C19 substrates, if clinically indicated.  If co-administration with warfarin (a CYP2C9 substrate) cannot be avoided, consider increasing frequency of international normalized ratio (INR) monitoring.

Because of the potential for serious adverse reactions in breast-fed children from Rubraca, advise lactating women not to breastfeed during treatment with Rubraca and for 2 weeks after the last dose.

You may report side effects to the FDA at 1‑800‑FDA‑1088 or www.fda.gov/medwatch. You may also report side effects to Clovis Oncology, Inc. at 1‑415‑409‑7220 (US toll) or 1‑844‑CLVS‑ONC (1‑844‑258‑7662; US toll-free).

Please see full Prescribing Information for additional Important Safety Information.

 

References: 1. Rubraca [prescribing information]. Boulder, CO: Clovis Oncology; 2018. 2. Oza AM, Tinker AV, Oaknin A, et al. Antitumor activity and safety of the PARP inhibitor rucaparib in patients with high-grade ovarian carcinoma and a germline or somatic BRCA1 or BRCA2 mutation: Integrated analysis of data from Study 10 and ARIEL2. Gynecol Oncol. 2017;147(2):267-275.

INDICATIONS

Rubraca is indicated:

  • for the maintenance treatment of adult patients with recurrent epithelial ovarian, fallopian tube, or primary peritoneal cancer who are in a complete or partial response to platinum-based chemotherapy

  • for the treatment of adult patients with deleterious BRCA mutation (germline and/or somatic)-associated epithelial ovarian, fallopian tube, or primary peritoneal cancer who have been treated with two or more chemotherapies. Select patients for therapy based on an FDA-approved companion diagnostic for Rubraca

SELECT IMPORTANT SAFETY INFORMATION

Read full ISI

Myelodysplastic Syndrome (MDS)/Acute Myeloid Leukemia (AML) occur uncommonly in patients treated with Rubraca® (rucaparib) tablets, and are potentially fatal adverse reactions. In approximately 1100 treated patients, MDS/AML occurred in 12 patients (1.1%), including those in long term follow-up. Of these, 5 occurred during treatment or during the 28 day safety follow-up (0.5%). The duration of Rubraca treatment prior to the diagnosis of MDS/AML ranged from 1 month to approximately 28 months. The cases were typical of secondary MDS/cancer therapy-related AML; in all cases, patients had received previous platinum-containing regimens and/or other DNA damaging agents.

Do not start Rubraca until patients have recovered from hematological toxicity caused by previous chemotherapy (≤ Grade 1).

Monitor complete blood counts for cytopenia at baseline and monthly thereafter for clinically significant changes during treatment.  For prolonged hematological toxicities (> 4 weeks), interrupt Rubraca or reduce dose (see Dosage and Administration (2.2) in full Prescribing Information) and monitor blood counts weekly until recovery. If the levels have not recovered to Grade 1 or less after 4 weeks or if MDS/AML is suspected, refer the patient to a hematologist for further investigations, including bone marrow analysis and blood sample for cytogenetics. If MDS/AML is confirmed, discontinue Rubraca.

Based on its mechanism of action and findings from animal studies, Rubraca can cause fetal harm when administered to a pregnant woman. Apprise pregnant women of the potential risk to a fetus.  Advise females of reproductive potential to use effective contraception during treatment and for 6 months following the last dose of Rubraca.

Most common adverse reactions in ARIEL3 (≥ 20%; Grade 1-4) were nausea (76%), fatigue/asthenia (73%), abdominal pain/distention (46%), rash (43%), dysgeusia (40%), anemia (39%), AST/ALT elevation (38%), constipation (37%), vomiting (37%), diarrhea (32%), thrombocytopenia (29%), nasopharyngitis/upper respiratory tract infection (29%), stomatitis (28%), decreased appetite (23%), and neutropenia (20%).

Most common laboratory abnormalities in ARIEL3 (≥ 25%; Grade 1-4) were increase in creatinine (98%), decrease in hemoglobin (88%), increase in cholesterol (84%), increase in alanine aminotransferase (ALT) (73%), increase in aspartate aminotransferase (AST) (61%), decrease in platelets (44%), decrease in leukocytes (44%), decrease in neutrophils (38%), increase in alkaline phosphatase (37%), and decrease in lymphocytes (29%).

Most common adverse reactions in Study 10 and ARIEL2 (≥ 20%; Grade 1-4) were nausea (77%), asthenia/fatigue (77%), vomiting (46%), anemia (44%), constipation (40%), dysgeusia (39%), decreased appetite (39%), diarrhea (34%), abdominal pain (32%), dyspnea (21%), and thrombocytopenia (21%).

Most common laboratory abnormalities in Study 10 and ARIEL2 (≥ 35%; Grade 1-4) were increase in creatinine (92%), increase in alanine aminotransferase (ALT) (74%), increase in aspartate aminotransferase (AST) (73%), decrease in hemoglobin (67%), decrease in lymphocytes (45%), increase in cholesterol (40%), decrease in platelets (39%), and decrease in absolute neutrophil count (35%).

Co-administration of rucaparib can increase the systemic exposure of CYP1A2, CYP3A, CYP2C9, or CYP2C19 substrates, which may increase the risk of toxicities of these drugs.  Adjust dosage of CYP1A2, CYP3A, CYP2C9, or CYP2C19 substrates, if clinically indicated.  If co-administration with warfarin (a CYP2C9 substrate) cannot be avoided, consider increasing frequency of international normalized ratio (INR) monitoring.

Because of the potential for serious adverse reactions in breast-fed children from Rubraca, advise lactating women not to breastfeed during treatment with Rubraca and for 2 weeks after the last dose.

You may report side effects to the FDA at 1‑800‑FDA‑1088 or www.fda.gov/medwatch. You may also report side effects to Clovis Oncology, Inc. at 1‑415‑409‑7220 (US toll) or 1‑844‑CLVS‑ONC (1‑844‑258‑7662; US toll-free).

Please see full Prescribing Information for additional Important Safety Information.